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Posts Tagged ‘John C Maxwell’

Guaranteed ways to get and keep your employees communicating…at work!

Employee communication is critical to getting maximum contribution from your employees. Poor interpersonal and communication skills are consistently ranked in the top five reasons managers fail. Poor communication skills can manifest themselves in many ways, including:

  • Feuds
  • Avoiding communication with co-workers
  • Hostile attitudes

These are all dangerous, but avoiding communication with co-workers has some of the biggest implications. The best way to make sure you do not fall into this black hole is by creating a culture of open dialogue at your workplace. Employee communication automatically improves when employees sense that communicating new ideas is encouraged by management. Here are easy ways to make sure you are creating a culture of open dialogue in your organization:

1) Create ground rules: Before ideas and opinions start flying, create and enforce ground rules to make sure everyone keeps it friendly. This includes rules about curse words and discriminatory comments.  Make sure you emphasize that all comments need to be professional and relevant  to the issue at hand. Guidelines prevent employees from getting off task, when
they are more likely to make inappropriate comments.

Why this matters: Nothing derails employee communication faster than discriminatory and rude remarks. If an employee is on the receiving end of these remarks, he or she may shut down and refuse to provide valuable opinions, insight and direction. The goal is to make sure everyone feels respected and feels like their opinions matter.

2) Don’t just say there is an open-door policy, create it: It is vital that you walk the walk when it comes to promoting employee communication in the workplace.  Begin by setting the example. Make sure you are continually asking for your
employees’ opinions on major decisions. It is also important to leave time to regularly meet with your employees.

Why this matters: You can tell your employees that there is an open-door policy, but unless they see it, they will not feel comfortable speaking up. If employees consistently try to meet with you to no avail, they will eventually assume that employee communication is not important to you and stop trying. But if you lead the way, by creating multiple opportunities for employees to speak up, they will.

3) Regularly update employees: Keep your employees in the loop on upcoming decisions, events, mergers or any other changes you anticipate will be important. If your employees have complete information, they will be able to
make more informed recommendations.

Why this matters: Open dialogue in the workplace will only be helpful in an environment where employees are informed. If they are not, they will fire off suggestions that are not in line with where the organization is headed strategically.

4) Help your employees develop effective presentation skills: There will come a time for most of your employees when they will have to present ideas in formal meetings. Do not let poor presentation skills be the hurdle to having your employee’s idea considered by executives. Utilize training programs if necessary.

Why this matters: Open communication in the workplace is not just about throwing all of your thoughts out there. It is about being able to present your ideas in a way that others will understand. Effective presentation skills will help you do this. People are more likely to respond favorably to an idea communicated in an effective, professional way.

Contributed by Profiles International

Shortcuts now, consequences later

Two CEO’s of growing organizations are meeting with me to help identify two key players to grow their organizations. Both plan to invest significant time and training into these individuals, and offer worthy compensation plans with no cap on their earning potential.

What is the number one request that each individual possess to meet these CEO’s selection criteria? Proven top performer in their industry? History of consistent accomplishment? Wonderful personality?

No, it can be defined as “character”.

John C. Maxwell in The Maxwell Daily Reader shares a quote of a nineteenth century clergyman, Phillips Brooks as saying, “Character is made in the small moments of our life.” Maxwell explains, “Anytime you break a moral principle, you create a small crack in your foundation of integrity. And when times get tough, it becomes harder to act with integrity, not easier. Character isn’t created in a crisis; it only comes to light.”

“Developing and maintaining integrity require constant attention. Josh Weston, chairman and CEO of Automatic Data Processing, Inc, says, “I’ve always tried to live with the following simple rule: ‘Don’t do what you wouldn’t feel comfortable reading about in the newspapers the next day.”

(Or showing up on YouTube!)

"Pat brings her charm, wit and insight into her advisory relationships and shares the same with her audiences. She's got the systems to back up her concepts."

- Frank Maguire FEDEX Senior Founding Executive

John Maxwell

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Profiles Int'l